Our Water, Our Future

Our Water, Our Future


They came in slowly. They came in behind the
scenes. They came in and affected my government: My elected [officials]. I hear the words coming
out of their mouths, and I know it’s Nestlé talking. And that bothers me a lot. People didn’t speak up because the city has led everyone to believe that it’s a done deal, and there’s nothing they can do about it. Which we now know is not true. Nestlé is too big for our town. They are here to take our water, to privatize it and sell it back to us, and it’s just not right. They are telling us things that they don’t know. They’re telling us they know that the water is not going to run dry, and they don’t know that. Nobody knows that. They’re not listening to the people or looking out for the interest of the people in the community. They’re just going to continue to bottle… Until there’s nothing left to bottle where they are. And then they’ll move on to another place. Well what I love about living in Cascade Locks and the Columbia River Gorge is, it is truly spectacular. It’s a treasure here. In Oregon, there’s always been, it seems like, an abundance of water. But it’s really been changing. People really
noticed last summer because of the drought, but for those of us who have been looking
at the mountain and looking at rainfall, we know it’s been happening for years, that there’s
been a change of the weather pattern. Fresh, clean water is, it’s the new gold. It is the most precious thing on the planet. And there are water grabs happening everywhere. And Nestlé right now is getting closer to doing a water deal in Cascade Locks. The bread and butter of the county is agriculture, and I want to make sure that we have enough water to sustain the existing orchards and farms in our county. That would be a disaster, I
think, for our local economy. The truck traffic would be going through our downtown at approximately one every four minutes. These are large, 20,000-pound trucks. They’re going to have to go right
through our downtown. It will affect our tourism, it will affect our merchants… It’s going to affect our roads. That’s a lot of truck traffic. Living in this town, talking to the Native
Americans, what’s at stake for them? Their culture, their economy, their spiritual practices are really rooted in water. In a bigger way, I mean, all the water is sacred to Native people. This particular spring, though, those are healing waters. So in that way, you know, this is
sacred. We’re supposed to protect it. The transfer of water rights, there’s no way around it, it violates our treaty. To sell that water, to sell Oxbow Springs, is intrinsically a violation of our spiritual practices. When I heard that any large company was going to come and bottle our water, I had a visceral response to this. It was almost like a calling:
“You need to do something. Now.” All of a sudden this year there was just like this tidal change where people started realizing, and Pamela is the one that got us together. We were all against Nestlé, but we didn’t have any plan against Nestlé. We had our first meeting, you know,
less than a year ago, and it was all Cascade Locks citizens, and myself from Hood River, and everyone started talking, and the first meeting was so joyous, because people were,
I think, thrilled to see they weren’t alone. And so we became The Local Water Alliance. I am the Campaign Director for the Local Water Alliance. And we have sponsored a ballot measure for our county, for Hood River County, to essentially prohibit large-scale commercial bottling in not only Cascade Locks but our entire county. I think the ballot measure
itself is a wonderful thing. There’s two parts of it. One is that you cannot bottle more than 1,000 gallons a day in Hood River County. And the other part is you are not allowed
to export whatever water you do bottle out of Hood River County. The Yes vote for this ballot measure to protect our water, that would also be a Yes vote to save the indigenous people of this river right here. That’s what that vote would do. In a year’s time, we went from nothing to people that got organized and became a coalition of groups saying, “No. We need to protect our water.” And so, it’s really the citizens. Because none of us are professional anything, you know. We’re all just citizens, that have jobs, and have lives,
and have families, coming together to say, “No. We need to protect our natural resources.” We’re motivated from our love, from our heart, so it’s a different kind of a sacrifice, then, when you’re working with, you know, what you love and protecting what you love. I hope that with this campaign we can hopefully get people to really be more thoughtful about their own habits, and to essentially not drink bottled water, you know, from these cheap plastic bottles, and to be more thoughtful in their habits and drink tap. If a company like this comes to your town, you need to start talking to your neighbors. You need to start talking to your friends. You need to start going to the city council meetings. You need to start getting people aware of what this really means for your town. What the implications are. Look at the long-term situation. I won’t say if, I’ll say WHEN our ballot initiative passes, it would make it illegal for Nestlé or any other large-scale
water bottling company to do set up shop here.

You May Also Like

About the Author: John Markowski

28 Comments

  1. Fight Nestlé everywhere! Why? Look where they've been. When you see "Poland Spring" water on a shelf, that's Nestlé, stealing from the people of the State of Maine. There's no spring, anymore, thanks to Nestlé. Not only is there no spring, but local wells have to be driven deeper and deeper and deeper. Why?
    Nestlé.

  2. All corporations care about is money and making more of it. They don't care about anyone unless they can make them more money. Like they said in the video. Water is the next gold. So corporations will invest in water to make money. This is why corporations don't want regulations. The only way to solve this and any problem like this is to get money out of politics and get the politicians working for the people again.

  3. Really? Who the fuck you think cares about about your "spirituality"? You couldn't find other more solid reason for protecting Nature? I challenge you to come up with something better.

  4. Money and progress is more important than spirituality and water! #sarcasm Beautiful video. Thanks for all what you're doing. Also, if you really care, about the environment and natural resources, including water, please reduce as much as you can your consumption of animal products, since this is by far the main cause of global warming (please watch Cowspiracy to learn why and how). Thanks and love from Argentina.

  5. I just hate all these money minded rich people , they are selfish nothing else ?????????????????????????????

  6. What an inspiring group of women, they're doing the right thing. Bottled water is a SCAM to the highest degree, the way they have marketed has been a scare tactic to the highest degree. They made people think things are wrong with tap water so they buy bottled water but there's NOTHING wrong with tap water. People have to get used to using stainless steel water bottles and refilling them.

  7. Oregon is one of the many States controlled and funded by the Rockefeller Foundation – the NWO of the corporate oligarchy.

  8. Denton, TX here. We've seen what happens when the people say one thing, and big business says the other. Good luck.

  9. Captions:

    In 2007, Nestle came to Cascade Locks, Oregon.
    And has since been trying to obtain bottling rights to Oxbow Springs.

    Kaitlin Stuart, Cascade Locks Resident.
    They came in slowly, they came in behind the scenes, they came in and affected my government, my electeds. I hear the words coming out of their mouths, and I know it’s Nestle talking and that bothers me a lot. All of a sudden this year there was just like this tidal change where people started realizing, and Pamela is the one that got us together. We were all against Nestle, but we didn’t have any plan against Nestle.

    Deanna Busdieker, Cascade Locks. City Council Member
    People didn’t speak up because the city has led everyone to believe that it’s a done deal and there’s nothing they can do about it. Which we now know is now true.

    Kathy Tittle, Cascade Locks Resident
    Nestle is too big for our town. They are here to take our water, to privatize it and sell it back to us and it’s just not right. They’re telling us things that they don’t know, that the water is not going to run dry and they don’t know that. Nobody knows that.

    Michael Barthmus Water Alliance volunteer
    They’re not listening to the people or looking out for the interest of the people in the community. They’re just going to continue to bottle until there’s nothing left to bottle where they are and then they’ll move onto another place.

    Well what I love about living in Cascade Locks, Oregon and the Columbia River Gorge is, it is truly spectacular. It’s a treasure here.

    Pamela Larsen, Founder of Local Food Water Alliance
    In Oregon, there’s always been, it seems like, an abundance of water but it's really been changing. People really noticed last summer because of the drought, but for those of us who have been looking at the mountain and looking at the rainfall, we know it's been happening for years, that there’s been a change of the weather pattern.
    Fresh clean water is the new gold. It is the most precious thing on the planet. And there are water grabs happening everywhere. And Nestle right now is getting closer to doing a water deal in Cascade Locks.

    When I heard that any large company was going to come and bottle our water, I had a visceral response to this. It was almost like a calling: you need to do something. Now.
    We had our first meeting less than a year ago, and it was all Cascade Locks citizens, and myself from Hood River. And everyone started talking and the first meeting was so joyous, because people were, I think, thrilled to see they weren’t alone. And so we became the Local Water Alliance.

    I think the ballot measure itself is a wonderful thing. There’s two parts of it. One is that you cannot bottle more than 1,000 gallons a day in Hood River County.
    And the other part is that you are not allowed to export whatever water you do bottle out of Hood River County.

    In a year’s time, we went from nothing to people that got organized and became a coalition of groups saying, “no. we need to protect our water.” And so, it’s really the citizens. Because none of us are professional anything, you know. We’re all just citizens that have jobs and lives and family coming together to say “No. we need to protect our natural resources.” We’re motivated from our love, from our heart, so it’s a different kind of sacrifice then. When you're working with what you love and protecting what you love.

    If a company like this comes to your town, you need to start talking to your neighbors. You need to start talking to your friends. You need to start going to the city council meetings. You need to start getting people aware of what this really means for your town. What the implications are. Look at the long-term situation.

    Aurora Del Val, Local Water Alliance Campaign Director
    The bread and butter of the county is agriculture and I want to make sure we have enough water to sustain the existing orchards and farms in our county. That would be a disaster i think for our local economy,Living in this town, talking to the Native Americans, what’s at stake for them? Their culture, their economy, their spiritual practices are really rooted in water. I am the Campaign Director for the Local Water Alliance. And we have sponsored a ballot measure for our county, for Hood River County to essentially prohibit large-scale commercial bottling in not only Cascade Locks but our entire county.

    The truck traffic would be going through our downtown at approximately one every four minutes. These are large, 20,000 pound trucks. They’re going to have to go right through our downtown. It will affect our tourism, it will affect our merchants, It’s going to affect our roads. That’s a lot of truck traffic.

    I Hope that with this campaign we can hopefully get people to really be more thoughtful about their own habits, and to essentially not drink bottled water from these cheap plastic bottles and to be more thoughtful in their habits and to drink tap.

    I won’t say if, I’ll say WHEN our ballot initiative passes, it would make it illegal for Nestle or any other large-scale water bottling company to set up shop here.

    Klairice Westley, Co-founder of Wanapum Fishing People Against Nestle
    In a bigger way, I mean, all the water is sacred to Native people. This particular spring, though, those are healing waters. So in that way, you know, this is sacred. We’re supposed to protect it. The transfer of water rights, there’s no way around it. It violates our treaty. To sell that water, to sell Oxbow Springs, is intrinsically a violation of our spiritual practices. The Yes vote for this ballot measure to protect our water, that would also be a Yes vote to save the indigenous people of this river right here. That’s what that vote would do.

  10. It is a fact that water is 3~times more $worth$ than crude oil is right-now'!, so we all can see the large scope of this whole fight about water rights that these large corporations are trying to squeeze in-on'!, look at what Nestlé and other big conglomerates like PepsiCo and Coca~Cola did over in other countries like India and Afghanistan ect'!… Thanks so much for this video'!, it's very inspiring to people that are going through the same thing, and more important'!, for the people that might/will go through the same ordeal with their local waterway's in their States, Counties, Cities, & Towns'!, thank you very~much'!, GOD Bless You&Yours'!!!!!…

  11. I think the film needs to include a brief explanation of the damage that Nestlé could cause, in the way as the subject is presented in The Story of The Stuff book or short films. I wish you good luck!

  12. Definitely No to Nestle. The economy of Cascade Locks is so depressed, a small local company should bottle the water and sell it.

  13. Nestles tried the same thing in McCloud CA anf the towns people stood together to put a stop to it. At least fro now. They did buy the closed lumber mill and it's water rights to the McCloud river. So the battle is not over and the towns people still need to keep their eye on Nestle and watch them every minute. To read about McCloud Vs Nestles visit this web site.
    http://www.alternet.org/story/142645/after_6-year_battle%2C_mccloud%2C_ca_defeats_water_bottling_giant_nestle

  14. Exclusive water rights is an archaic practice meant only for regions where water is very scarce. In places like western Oregon, everyone needs to share responsibly.

  15. West of the Continental Divide the Government Owns ALL the water ,
    Even the Rain on your Roof.
    Now you want Property Wrights???

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *